Overqualified

I am overqualified for most jobs I need in order to gain enough experience for the jobs I am qualified for as a recent college graduate. Fortunately, my education provided me with an excellent background in marketing, but I don’t have the experience for my knowledge base. I have recently applied almost everywhere, but there is a large problem, I am overqualified or actually under qualified for a position in a specialized department within a store. I know this because of their piss poor responses they give me because, yes, I ask them point blank why they did not hire me.

I went to a job interview at Lowe’s last week and it was quite the experience. I handed the assembly line I experienced my resume and immediately regretted this action. I was granted two interviews and in each interview both failed to even glance at my resume. They fired hypothetical questions at me and know exactly what they want to know, but failed to learn anything about me as a person. I know “through my answers they gained knowledge and insight”, but did they really? I interviewed for a paint department position in which I would assist customers in picking out a paint color that best suits their style, preference, and subconsciously their personality. I understand the psychology of color, marketing techniques used, advanced selling techniques, and contemporary, traditional, and minimalism approaches to architecture and design but was unable to work most of this into the interview because of the rapid-fire questions. I was passed over for someone “better” qualified but I was clearly overqualified for this position, as with the bank teller positions I have applied for. I have been told over the phone and to my face I am overqualified. They have previously made it terribly uncomfortable. And then I was passed over.

When hiring managers are interviewing candidates and label them as overqualified, this is what they are thinking:

1) My salary expectations are likely higher than the role pays, therefore they cannot pay me enough.

2)  I’m too optimistic and I don’t fully understand what the job entails, or I will be quick to prove myself and move up the ladder.

3) They think there is a high probability I will be bored, frustrated, and leave. I have heard this several times. A travel agency told me they did not think I would be challenged enough on a daily basis.

4) There may be a chance I will be more experienced than my manager, and would be uncomfortable taking direction from them.

5)  I will leave as soon as a better opportunity comes around and I’m only applying because I’m desperate (which I am, but I also need experience in my field regardless of my position).

I always address this issue in the cover letter and, when given the opportunity, will address this in the interview. But sometimes it still doesn’t matter because I still do not offer job security. I can only hope that interviews from this point on go better than my last.

Why Employers Don’t Want to Hire Overqualified Candidates (http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2013/07/31/why-employers-dont-want-to-hire-overqualified-candidates)

Mentally Petite

“That knowing is better than wondering, that waking is better than sleeping, and even the biggest failure, even the worst, beats the hell out of never trying.”

                                                                                                                  Grey’s Anatomy

I arduously consider this quote, pondering the aforementioned. Personally, I never want to know something bad when I can hope for the best. When my life is amazing, I would rather wake on my own accord, and when it is terrible I actually prefer to not face the day. So I don’t believe this to be necessarily true, either. The last third of this inspirational quote, however, causes a type of intrinsic crisis: “Even the biggest failure, even the worst, beats the hell out of never trying”.

The worst failure, the biggest failure, at the worst time, can be inconvenient for some people; the strong individuals will face “minor setbacks” and try again. However, the very same event trouncing a previously fragile individual is detrimental. I have shattered into over 300 pieces on my bedroom floor for every rejected Resume and failed job interviews. It has taken three months for doctors, friends, my boyfriend, and my parents especially, to meticulously glue me back together. I am a petite girl. I look frail, delicate, breakable, and brittle. They are all synonyms for each other, obviously, and unfortunately, I am mentally “petite” as well. My body and my mind will break, shatter, and are easily hurt and destroyed because people push me to believe “The biggest failure, even the worst, beats the hell out of never trying”.

“Keep applying”, “Keep your head down and push through”, “Eight to ten job applications a day and you will get there”. This isn’t true. Sometimes you simply fail in today’s job market when you only have an undergraduate degree and are without experience. I am applying at locations where I will operate machinery now, hoping to gain job experience. Yes, I am still waiting for job interview two and they did not even look at my Resume or ask about my degree. I turn 25 next month. I have learned one valuable life lesson: Never look down on an individual with 6 years of professional experience who opted out of college. I hold a piece of paper, and…. a piece of paper.